Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

12 Comforting Picture Books about Home

Young children love reading about other kids’ everyday lives. They like seeing people, places, and experiences that are similar to their own leaping off the pages. In my list below of cozy children’s books about home, children will surely find at least one book that will make them exclaim, “that’s like my house!” They’ll also find books about homes that are different than theirs, which can spark important conversations about diversity. Let’s dive in!

Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

Disclosure: For your convenience, this post includes affiliate links. If you purchase items through these links, I may earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. I received a free copy of Time for Bed, Old House from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. You can read my full disclosure policy here.

Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

This Is Our House by Hyewon Yum

What makes a house into an extra special kind of home? When multiple generations of a family have lived there. A little girl introduces us to her home, where her grandparents first “arrived from far away with just two suitcases in hand.” We watch her mother as a young child, taking her first steps and playing on the stoop. Gradually the house fills up with siblings (who of course grow up!) While brothers and sisters move out, her grandparents remain and her father – and eventually the little girl – also appear, making their own mark on their home. (Recommended for ages 2 – 6. Korean-American author/illustrator.)

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Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

Time for Bed, Old House by Janet Costa Bates and AG Ford

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I smiled through every page of this sweet story! Grandpop’s house is a fun place to play, but the idea of going to sleep there makes Isaac nervous. Grandpop reassures him that he doesn’t have to go to sleep, but the house does need to be put to bed. As they make the rounds turning off the lights, Isaac discovers what all the unfamiliar sounds of the house are.

Grandpop wisely asks Isaac to read the house a story (or at least describe the pictures to it). When Isaac discovers that he’s read Grandpop to sleep, he knows just what to do. (Recommended for ages 3 – 7. Cape-Verdean American author.)

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Dinner on Domingos by Alexandra Katona and Claudia Navarro

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A list of picture books about home of course needs to include the wonderful meals people eat there!

Inspired by the author’s memories of Sunday dinners at her Ecuadorian grandma’s house, this charming picture book captures the warmth and playfulness of family and food. Alejandra loves visiting her abuela and her “huge extended family,” even when things become a bit chaotic. When Abuelita can’t take the growing noise, she yells “Basta” (enough) and turns on the music so they can dance together. Though Alejandra sometimes can’t understand Abuelita’s Spanish, they can always communicate in the language of home. (Recommended for ages 4 – 8. Ecuadorian-American author.)

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When You Are Brave by Pat Zietlow Miller and Eliza Wheeler

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This visually and emotionally stunning book provides comforting guidance about courage as a child moves from their former home into a new house. As the family’s car makes the slow journey to their new house, the gray and blue illustrations mirror the child’s caution and worries. But as the spark of bravery becomes a flame, twinkling light spreads across the pages, highlighting the magic of this new place that will one day become home. (Recommended for ages 4 – 8. White author.)

Related Post: 13 diverse picture books about feelings

Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

Home in the Woods by Eliza Wheeler

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Sometimes moving to a new home is borne out of tragedy. Wheeler wrote this book to honor the story of her own Grandmother, who had to move into a shack in the woods during the Great Depression, soon after her father died.

As Marvel, her mother, and her six siblings move into the tiny ramshackle house, Mum tells her “you never know what treasures we’ll find.” While her older brother Ray seems reassured, Marvel doesn’t think the one room house will be “much of a home to me.”

Despite poverty and lots of hard work, Marvel and her siblings to find small pockets of treasure and delight, from nature and their vivid imaginations. Gradually, the tar paper shack begins to look like a true home to Marvel. (Recommended for ages 4 – 8. White author/illustrator.)

Related Post: 18 children’s books about poverty and hunger

Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

Mi Casa Is My Home by Laurenne Sala and Zara González Hoang

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In this children’s book about home, young Lucia welcomes readers into her cozy, friendly, multigenerational house, where Spanish and English are intermingled. Things are very busy in her casa, from the sala where she builds blanket forts to keep out the light (and the hermanos) to the cocina where Mamá performs cooking milagros.

I appreciated that the story didn’t get bogged down with translating Spanish phrases. Lucia just speaks to us like she would a friend as she gives us a tour of her home. Children who don’t speak Spanish will be able to figure out most of the words from clues in the pictures and texts. (Recommended for ages 4 – 8. Puerto-Rican and Spanish American author.)

Related Post: 20 engaging picture books starring Latine characters

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Here and There by Tamara Ellis Smith and Evelyn Daviddi

Purchase from Barefoot Books (supports a small, woman-owned publisher)

This picture book about home is actually about feeling comfortable in two different houses now that Mom and Dad don’t live together anymore.

Ivan wants to stay Here (Mama’s house) where he can climb the tree and feed his favorite birds. But he has to go There (Dad’s new house) where nothing feels quite right. A noisy kid by nature, Ivan grows quiet until Dad starts to play his guitar. As familiar birds join in the song, Ivan begins to see how both Here and There can feel like home. (Recommended for ages 3 – 7. White author.)

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The Many Colors of Harpreet Singh by Supriya Kelkar and Alea Marley

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Harpreet loves colors, and he especially enjoys using them to express his feelings. When he feels cheerful, he wears a yellow patka (a Sikh turban.) On days he needs courage, he wears red. When Harpreet has to say goodbye to his home because his family is moving across the country, he knows he’ll need a lot of courage.

Once school starts, Harpreet wears a white patka over and over, because he wants to feel invisible. Will he ever feel like wearing the other colors again? (Recommended for ages 3 – 7. Indian-American author.)

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Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

If You Lived Here: Houses of the World by Giles Laroche

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As children read books about home, it can be fun to imagine what it would be like to live in a house that’s very different from yours. If You Lived Here is designed to spark just those types of conversations. It’s also great for children who are curious about building or architecture.

Each page is filled with elaborate, cut paper collages of a particular type of home. There’s a general description of the home type, followed by more detailed info on where this type of home is located and how it’s made. One tip to discourage stereotypes: be sure to share with children that not all people of a particular ethnicity or location live in the house type that is shown. (Recommended for ages 6 – 10. White author.)

Grandma’s Tiny House: A Counting Story by JaNay Brown-Wood and Priscilla Burris

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This counting book asks the question: how will Grandma fit all the family in her tiny house since the family (plus friends) keeps growing and growing? As they gather for a festive meal, 3 neighbors bring four pots of greens, and five friends bring six dozen biscuits with pear jam. (When 9 aunties brought 10 cheesecakes, my interest was really piqued!) When 15 hungry grandchildren arrive, there’s barely room to turn around, let alone eat. What can they do? (Recommended for ages 2 – 5. Black author.)

Grab my printable list of top diverse books for every age, from 2 to 12

Plus, discover which “classic” books I don’t recommend because of racist content.

You’ll also get my kids and justice themed resources in your inbox each Tuesday. Don’t like it? No problem. You can unsubscribe in one click. 

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Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

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Sometimes finding home is a much bigger project that becoming settled into a new house. This gorgeous picture book is based on Morales’ own journey of moving to the United States from Mexico with her infant son. So much is unfamiliar, from a new language to new rules (like not letting your child climb into a pubic fountain.)

When they walk into the library for the first time, it is also a surprising place, but only in the most delightful ways. Books themselves became the home of this mother and child, and helped them find their voice in their greater community. (Recommended for ages 4 – 8. Mexican-American author.)

Related Post: 14 children’s books about immigrants and refugees

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Explore what makes a place feel like home and peek into many different children's houses with these comforting picture books about home.

A New Home by Tania de Regil

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This unique book about home follows two children who are moving far away: one from New York to Mexico City, and the other from Mexico City to New York. Detailed parallel illustrations and narrative from both children reveal they have the same questions about where they are going. Will there be places to play, spots to stop at for delicious snacks, and places to explore the past? The questions and illustrations are both a tribute to the cities they are leaving, and express hopes and fears about where they are going. (Recommended for ages 3 – 8. Mexican author.)

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One response to “12 Comforting Picture Books about Home”

  1. Linda Schmale Avatar
    Linda Schmale

    This list is lovely. Thank you for your generosity in sharing these wonderful titles.